Hello!

My name is Lily-Sue, but my mummy calls me Munchkin (or 'Munch' for short!) I am 8 years old, and this is where my mummy will help me write all about all the fun things we do together. I hope you enjoy reading about the adventures of my mummy and me, Munchkin, with the occasional appearance from the siblings - Beastie and Plumlet.

Saturday, 10 December 2016

Talking TABOOS with your daughters: Giveaway!

Talk about it!


As an adult, women's intimate health can be difficult to discuss. The thought of having to visit the GP and talk about matters related to women's problems can be enough to make many women want to dive under the duvet and never emerge again! However, it should't be this way. 

Canesten® believe that personal success and development begins with a good level of self confidence, with the comfort in one's own body and with the strength to be able to discuss worries when necessary. And if we, as women, are happy to talk about our intimate health, then this same content attitude will pass on to our daughters, leading to a future of strong, confident, empowered women!


I remember, as a child, being handed a book by my mum. I can't have been much older than about 9 or 10 years old. It covered lots of topics related to growing up. You know, all the nitty gritty bits and pieces that your mum never really wanted to talk about until they had to. This book, I believe, was not an attempt to educate me on health issues, but more to prepare me for what was to come. It introduced puberty, and other changes that I could expect to experience as I approached my teenage years. I don't feel my mum intended for this little book to replace the valuable knowledge a mother can pass on to her daughter, but rather for it to be a starting point - something to get the cogs working in my mind and to evoke a path of questioning. No mother wants to initiate the talk, as it can be difficult to know where to start ... and where to stop! This book meant that I could approach my mum myself with a basic foundation of knowledge on which she could build, in order to help me to grow into a health smart teenager.


As a mum to two girls, I am happy that, for now, both are very comfortable telling me when something doesn't feel right. They are open with me about any pain they might feel or about any unusual irritation they might experience. In response to their worries, I am equally open with them, making them feel as though they are right to talk to me and ensuring that I am as attentive as they want me to be. I would hate for them to feel as though these issues were in any way embarrassing or uncommon, as this is where taboos begin. Within this, I am also certain to help them to understand a level of appropriateness too, an awareness of the right people to talk to about these worries. They know which people in their lives are appropriate to trust with intimate information and the individuals who will help them in such situations. Announcing at the top of their voices in the middle of a crowded train carriage that they have a sore bum is the last thing anyone wants!

Teaching a good balance of openness and discretion is key to a feeling of confidence in any growing young lady!

Nowadays, primary schools include a good start to personal health in the curriculum. However, I like to think that the important bits of information will come from me. And I want to know that I can reinforce and build on anything that they learn in class. I would like to feel that any questions that they have that aren't answered at school can be answered by me. A lack of formal education about female health, both at school and at home, can lead to a lack of understanding when, later in life, they might find themselves with intimate conditions such as thrush - a common ailment which is easily treatable but which can be extremely unpleasant if a low level of confidence prevents them from finding out the best course of action. An ability and the knowledge and courage to recognise the symptoms and self diagnose common problems is a valuable lesson that we can all teach our girls.


So, when do you consider to be a good time to start teaching your daughter about her personal, intimate health and well being? Personally, I like to feel I have started early enough with the steps I have mentioned above. Some may think Munch, who is 7 years old, is too young to be educated in this way. It is a very personal matter and one which I feel is not open for judgement, but I do feel that, as parents, we can help educate each other on the ways in which we do things. However different our views might be, one thing we do have in common is the desire to keep our girls from harm and the passion to raise strong, independent, healthy women of the future!

Tell me your views in the comments below and complete the other competition entries for your chance to win a £100 Amazon voucher! On top of this, know that with your views and tips, you may well be helping another parent who is unsure about where and when to start educating their child about intimate health matters.

Good Luck Everyone!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Competition Terms & Conditions
This competition runs until 12am on 22nd December, 2016.
Competition only open to entrants 18 years and over.
There is 1 prize of one £100 Amazon voucher. 
The prize is non-transferable and no cash alternative is offered
Open to UK residents aged 18 and over, excluding employees and relatives of The Hart of the Munchkin Patch and Bayer plc
Entrants must log into Rafflecopter and leave a comment on this post. Failure to complete this step will result in disqualification from the competition.
The winner will be chosen at random from all valid entries. Every entry will be checked.
The winner will be informed within 14 days of the closing date and will need to respond with a postal address within 28 days or a new winner will be chosen. 
The winner’s name will be announced on the blog.
The prize will be sent within 28 days of receiving the winner’s address.
This is a joint promotion between The Hart of the Munchkin Patch and Canesten®
Entry to this competition confirms that participants have read, understood and agree to be bound by these Terms and Conditions 

This post has been supported by Canesten® but all thoughts and words are my own.

174 comments:

  1. I think age 11 is suitable (Just before high school)

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  2. I think age 9 or 10, maybe earlier depending on when puberty has started!

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  3. Don't think you can put an age on it it's when you feel your child is mature enough and ready

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  4. I think it depends a lot on the child. If they ask about it then that's ideal, but introducing little bits and pieces and normalising talking about those parts of the body can do a good job of laying the groundwork for later anyway.

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  5. I haven't got to that stage yet but i think it will depend on each child and how mature they are

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  6. I think they know too much these days I'd say 13

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  7. I would think,as early as possible.Early intervention invariably pays off.

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  8. As soon as they are old enough to fully understand which will vary slightly from person to person but about 11.

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  9. When the child shows signs of needing the talk.

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  10. I think it really depends on the child, but around the age of 12-13 seems about right.

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  11. I think as early as possible. After all, the bits are there and questions will be asked! Also girls can start periods from 9 (or even earlier in some cases) and I wouldn't want it coming as a shock! I myself started at 11 and luckily my mum had spoken to new about it. I was still horrified but at least I knew what it was!

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  12. I think I'd probably wait until the age of about 10 and then just have a chat at what she thinks she knows and take it from there xx

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  13. I THINK ABOUT 12 DEPENDING ON THEIR MATURITY LEVEL

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  14. Around 10 I think would be about right

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  15. Around 10 depends on the child really

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  16. I would say between 11 and 12, thanks.x

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  17. I think talking about it younger makes it more normal and girls are starting puberty earlier these days, so I would say around 7 or 8 for the basics.

    @rachiegr

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  18. I would say 13 and just make them feel at ease and make it a normal conversation x

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  19. I think 12 or 13 is a good age to start. She's only 7 so got a few years to go but no idea how i'm going to approach the subject!

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  20. around 10 puberty starts much earlier now

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  21. I don't think there's a specific age, I think we all know our own children and if we are relaxed about such topics it we will know when it is appropriate.

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  22. I think around 11 years old

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  23. Probably starting at age 10, but it depends on when the child begins puberty.

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  24. About 12 or 13, when they are mature enough to understand :)

    Thanks for a fantastic giveaway.

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  25. When they are starting secondary school

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  26. when you feel your child is mature enough, my mum used a book with me and let me read it which i found the best option

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  27. I always talked about everything with my son whenever it felt right, just treating things as normal and we've always been pretty open about things. He can and does talk to me about anything!

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  28. Like others, I think it depends a lot on the individual child. If they ask, whatever their age, that is a good time to educate them a little - obviously with age appropriate answers though! My mother didn't discuss anything with me and I only knew about periods when I got my first because we'd covered it in biology lessons!! That was a bit misleading in some respects because, according to what I was taught, my cycle was care free and I menstruated every 28-32 days - way different to my actual experiences. So as well as discussing what is 'meant' to happen, I think it important to discuss what is 'normal' in the real world as opposed to what the books/experts say and to discuss what isn't normal too, so girls know when to seek medical advice/attention

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  29. The younger the better, before teenage embarassment kickds in! Between 9-12.

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  30. I would say at about 10 or 11, just before they start secondary school/puberty.

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  31. Children are reaching puberty at an earlier age these days, so I suspect it may have to be 9

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  32. Just before they start senior school, but as each child is different it is impossible to put a definite age on it

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  33. I think around 11 but it depends on the child. If they ask questions then I will reply with an age appropriate response

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  34. i think about 10/11 really depends ont he child and when puberty starts

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  35. You can start very young and initiate it when bathing. If you can do it without embarrassment, its much easier and informative for the child.

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  36. I'd say around the 9 or 10 year mark, depending on the child.

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  37. It does depend but probably around 10/11 and just make it a chat about things at first.

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  38. I would say around 9 years of age

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  39. It depends on the child as all kids develop at different rates, but I'd say about 11-12. :)

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  40. I'd say around 8/9. The earlier the better so if they develop early it's not a scary thing for them.
    I'd rather talk to Emmy about these things than leave it for the school to do

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  41. Depends on the child but 9 or 10?

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  42. I'm thinking 11 maybe a bit later, it depends how mature they are

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  43. I think it depends on the individual child.

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  44. About the age of 10. I would start the conversation by asking what they know already.

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  45. As soon as they hit puberty, best time to learn about their selves

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  46. I think right from when they are small because then its natural not awkward and its normal. We talk about all kinds of stuff with my kids at the appropriate level to their age, I don't want them not to know!

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  47. I would say about 9 as some kids start puberty early and kids talk at school. Best to be open and relaxed with them

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  48. I think about aged 10 is a suitable age

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  49. It depends on the maturity of the child I would think 9 - 10 as a rough guide,

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  50. I would say age 11 but also depends on the maturity of the child

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  51. no specific age/time, just when it feels appropriate

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  52. As someone who started their period at age 10, I'm really happy my mum chose to tell me beforehand. It's fine saying 'I think they won't be mature enough' or 'they know too much so young', but when you're in primary school and your whole world turns upside down... having some idea as to what is happening makes it more bearable. It's about what your child needs, not what you think is correct.

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  53. Depends on the child, also if they ask you questions you should answer them the best you can at their level...

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  54. Only you know your child and its when you think its the right time x

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  55. 11 just before they go to secondary school

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  56. as soon as they start asking questions, before teens. i encourage questions and discussions even now

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  57. between 11 and 12 hopefully just before there bodies start to change

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  58. I think about 11, around about the time they start secondary school.

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  59. I don't think you can put an age on it as it's when you feel your child is old enough to understands as each child is unique

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  60. When it feels right for you and your child. Your child lets you know if they have a headache, the other matters are no different, just more private and personal. As long as they know they can talk to you, then that's half the battle won.

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  61. I think it depends on the child. As soon as they start to learn about hygiene these things should be gradually introduced so as not to shock children xx

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  62. i personally think about 11/12 but as the mum ,you will know whats best for your child x

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  63. I'd say from 11 or 12 as this is when they have started secondary school and will probably take more notice of the information. Any younger than this and it would probably just go straight over their heads.

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  64. Start as you mean to go on and make it 'normal' discussion from an early age - expanding upon the facts as they get older.

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  65. We have spoke about things from the age of 3 in a child friendly way, by the age of 9-10 I would think they would be confident with what they know.

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  66. I have 2 boys, there always asking questions from about 10, im willing to answer them.x

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  67. It will vary from child to child but probably as soon as they start being able to bath themself.

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  68. i'd say just before they go to secondary school but then again it also would depend on the child i think

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  69. Around nine or when the child is ready, and make the chat normal as possible.

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  70. I think it should be part of their ongoing education about their bodies. It's something they should gradually learn.

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  71. i think from the age of 3, you shuold talk about things in everday manner so its not taboo

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  72. Probably round about the age of 10 but if they ask questions sooner try to answer honestly as they hear alsorts in the playground

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  73. I think around age 12, but really does depend on your child. Personally I would want my child to know they are able to discuss any personal issues & deal with them when they arise.

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  74. around 11/12 before they start secondary school x

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  75. i think as soon as they are old enough to understand x

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  76. I think it depends on the child, some children mature quicker than others, i would tell my child when they either start asking questions or when they are aged about 8

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  77. My eldest son is 9 next May and we've already started to talk to him about intimate health care. It's quite an easy subject to throw into a conversation with him as his Dad is in the Health and fitness profession, so he has a good awareness!

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  78. I think it depends on the child as some mature much earlier than others

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  79. I would simply be open and honest at a young age of 9 or 10, I don't have a daughter but it's hard to talk to anyone about this sort of thing and if told and informed at the necessary age the child will feel more comfortable talking about it and won't think they are weird or going through it on their own

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  80. I think around age 10 however if your child starts asking questions before you should be honest and tell them (@beckaustin)

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  81. I think that you should answer questions truthfully as they come up

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  82. Every child is different in their maturity so it would depend on the individual - but go with the flow - if conversations arise go with it and be as open as is appropriate for their age

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  83. As soon as they are old enough to understand and communicate so not to make taboo of such subjects

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  84. Questions should be answered as soon as they start to arise, in an age appropriate fashion.

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  85. As soon as they are old enough to understand but done age appropriately

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  86. I always believe it depends on the child, i think you kinda know when its right for each child to mention it and discus things but i woildnt rush it unless ask themselves.

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  87. I think everyone is different, but whenever they start to show signs of being interested or wanting to know more!

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  88. It would depend on the childs mental maturity but its usually there when they have hit puberty.

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  89. I think it depends on the child but between 8-10

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  90. when they are old enough to understand - age 7 to 8 perhaps

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  91. I believe that the right age to discuss intimate health with your children is about 8/9 years old as knowledge is power and being informed will ensure they made hood decisions in the future.

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  92. The Basics from around 10 but if they are curious to learn with questions from 8 I would discuss some things. I really like to be honest and open and let them know it's OK to have questions.

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  93. As early as possible they learn the basics (correct names for their private area) in yr1 (age 5) as they do the pants learning early. I have always been very relaxed and open with my children think that's the best way to be xx

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  94. I think you can tell by the sorts of questions they start asking so it's probably a good time as soon as you know they have some knowledge. It lets you diesperse any myths and be open and honest with them at a stage when they're ready.

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  95. When age appropriate i.e. keeping clean and toilet habits from when they are little. My daughters both got their periods at 10 1/2, so that was discussed at 9, as you know roughly two years before the event.

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  96. Don't think you can put an age on it, when your child starts to ask those awkward questions is probably the time, and be honest and open

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  97. Answer questions as soon as they arise

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  98. I think it depends on the child but around the age of 10/11

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  99. I don't think there is a "set" age to talk to your child. All children develop at different rates and therefore some kids would be ready before others. I think its just ensuring your child knows you are there is they have any questions or want to talk and gauging the right age for your child! xx

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  100. think it depends on the child but say around 9 or 10 yrs, think its good the understand how/why their bodies changing so they don’t worry needlessly

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  101. I think pre-teen in general. I was quite young when I developed so 13/14 would have been faaaar too late!

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  102. Depending on how mature the child is I would suggest between the ages of 10-11 before puberty kicks in. Just be honest and not embarrassed and I think they will appreciate it.

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  103. I don’t think there is really a “right” age, I think it depends very much on the individual child. Some will be more curious than others, and of course they all mature at different rates! I would say let the child set the pace

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  104. 9 I think that age they will understand

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  105. I think it all depends on the child. My daughter was about 7 when she started asking questions

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  106. I think it depends. My little girl is 3 and knows I have a period every month because she has walked in on me. I haven't gone into great detail but I don't want her to be scared of them either. I'll decide on other things as she gets older.

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  107. I don't think there is too early an age to learn positive health education. The more openly we talk about issues that effect every single person's wellbeing the better for society as a whole.

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  108. Before starting Secondary School, or if they ask before hand!

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  109. Between the ages of 10 to 11 I thinks a good age to start.

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  110. I started talking to my daughter about this type of thing when she was 10. It just seemed the right time.

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  111. Hard to say an age, I think you just know. Books are a good idea, my mum did the same as yours.

    @smeethsaysfashn on twitter

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  112. I think it is difficult to put an actual age as it all depends on the child. However, if you are always open about these matters it will occur gradually and thus not cause any real problems later.

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  113. when they start asking questions

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  114. I do not think there is a right age - just a right time

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  115. About 11, but it depends on lots of other factors

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  116. Soon as they start asking questions best to give them the right information

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  117. Depends on the child and especially if there older friends or siblings around as they will pass information on!

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  118. I think it depends on the maturity of the individual child.

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  119. It depends on the child. Whenever my son asks anything I answer him as openly as possible. I believe this will stand us in good stead as he grows up and wants to know more. He should never feel embarrassed to ask. If he asks me something I'm not sure of, we look it up together.

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  120. I think about 11, as long as it is done in a sensitive and age appropriate way .

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  121. When they start to ask questions as they all mature at different rates and it is more natural.

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  122. I think around the age of 11, but could be earlier or could be later depending on when they start asking questions and how mature they are for their age generally. Parents know their children best, and you should just go with what you think is the right age for your child :)

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  123. I think that talking about bodies and intimate details should be an ongoing discussion from an early age so that it is normal and no big deal,

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  124. I think it depends on the individual child but any discussion should be age appropriate. I think a book can be a good starting point as something that can be read, and then discussed about, together.

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  125. I think you can start to use the right words when they are little Loobyloo@hotmail.com

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  126. I think it's important to talk about intimate health early but of course in age appropriate manner. I would introduce bits around 6-7 and add more in-depth information as they grow up.

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  127. I'd say around the 10-12 mark depending on how grown up they are

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  128. If they don't ask questions/intitiate any conversations first then it depends whether you want them to learn it at school first or you have the conversation first. Towards the end of primary school, sex ed and other subjects get brought up so you have to get in before then. 10/11.

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  129. I think it depends on the child. Maybe 9+ if I had to put an age on it

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  130. I dont think you can set a correct age for all kids. each parent knows their own

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  131. About 9 I think, but depends on the child.

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  132. Hard to say, my kids are under four but I like reading tips for the future :)

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  133. I think it should form normal conversation at home from an a early age. Not something that a big deal is made of.

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  134. I would not give it a number but whenever the child washes on his/her own is the right time to teach that talking about changes to their intimate parts is safe.

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  135. I think around 9-10, a book about the subject is a good thing to get

    by andrea e.

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  136. It's definitely a tricky one. I'd say it depends on the maturity of the child, but around 10 is probably a good time. Defintely before secondary school.

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  137. I think for a girl you need to be looking at around 10… so many are starting to develop earlier, I think its important to discuss before it happens and they have questions. It may help alleviate fears.

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  138. I always honestly answer their questions no matter what the age.

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  139. Tabout 10 depending on the child. I think it's best to be honest with children if they bring up the topics at an earlier age. By answering truthfully at an age appropriate level you are keeping the communication doors open!

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  140. Think about ten but
    I also think from3 they should be told that no one keeps secreats

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  141. My daughter has started asking questions at 8 - so I answer any of her questions as best I can :)

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